Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts | 501 S. Sapodilla Ave, WPB, FL 33401

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Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts | 501 S. Sapodilla Ave, WPB, FL 33401

THE MUSE

Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts | 501 S. Sapodilla Ave, WPB, FL 33401

THE MUSE

WHAT IS THE CENSUS?

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Licensed under public domain

 

What Is It?

The U.S. Census is a count and survey of American citizens that is taken every 10 years. Questions about age, ancestry, disability, marital status, and more can be found on the census forms. Though only a sample of American homes and businesses are asked to participate in this survey, the answers provide data about our citizens. The process is administered by the Census Bureau, a division of the Department of Commerce.

 

Why Is It Important?

The census provides crucial information on the population and demographics of our country, which directly affects how legislative districts are drawn, funds are allocated, and infrastructure is improved across the nation. The Census Bureau allocates $400 billion to American communities every year, and the census itself decides how and where those funds are spent. The census is even mentioned as a requirement in the Constitution.

 

Why Is It in the News Today?

As America approaches the 2020 census, lawmakers have considered reinstating a question that hasn’t been asked on the form since 1950: the question of the reader’s citizenship. This question may prompt many to avoid taking the census, which has drastic implications. Critics of the question–including the state of California who filed a lawsuit against the plan–say states with higher immigrant populations will be\underfunded as a result. And California is not alone. Twelve states declared in March “that they would sue to block the Trump administration from adding a question about citizenship to the 2020 census,” according to the New York Times. The Constitution says that all people living in America should be counted in the census, not just citizens, making this debate both a legal and a human rights issue.

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About the Contributor
Lila Goldstein, News Editor
Lila Goldstein is a second-year staffer on The Muse as well as News Editor. Lila has a passion for all kinds of writing, especially journalism, and is rarely ever without an opinion on current events. Outside of school, Lila loves to read, watch films, and collect records from vintage music stores (she so far has 62 albums). If you ever get in to a car with her and the Beatles radio station doesn’t immediately come on, something is terribly wrong. Lila is a green tea snob and West Palm Beach foodie, and always has a restaurant recommendation for Dreyfoos students. Overall, Lila is very excited to work with her News staffers to create an incredible section and make The Muse the best magazine it can possibly be.   If you would like to contact this staffer, you may reach them at [email protected]
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