Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts | 501 S. Sapodilla Ave, WPB, FL 33401

THE MUSE

Happening Now
  • April 22Streaming Canvas on April 26 at 6 p.m. in Meyer Hall
  • April 22AICE English General Paper Exam on April 25 at 8:00 a.m.
  • April 22Chamber Recital Concert on April 24 at 6:00 p.m. in the Norton Museum
  • April 22NHS Meeting on April 24 at 11:19 a.m. in the Media Center
  • April 22Spring into College Series on April 23 at 11:19 a.m. in the Media Center
Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts | 501 S. Sapodilla Ave, WPB, FL 33401

THE MUSE

Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts | 501 S. Sapodilla Ave, WPB, FL 33401

THE MUSE

Bring in the Teachers, Bring in the Magic

This school year’s new faculty introduce themselves and welcome exciting beginnings
Dressed+as+Professor+McGonagall%2C+AP+Precalculus+teacher+Monica+Russell+goes+over+answers+to+problems+that+students+assigned+to+the+different+Harry+Potter+houses+solved.+Each+correct+answer+gave+that+house+a+point.+%E2%80%9CI+hope+that+I+can+make+%28math%29+a+little+bit+more+interesting%2C%E2%80%9D+Mrs.+Russell+said.
Eszter Veres
Dressed as Professor McGonagall, AP Precalculus teacher Monica Russell goes over answers to problems that students assigned to the different Harry Potter houses solved. Each correct answer gave that house a point. “I hope that I can make (math) a little bit more interesting,” Mrs. Russell said.
Chemistry teacher Timothy Siniscalchi’s period 4 students sophomore dance major Isabella Main and sophomore dance major Josie Molodowitz laugh as Mr. Sinacalchi explains how phosphorus was discovered. “I don’t want my classes to just be words on a page, where rules are just things to memorize,” Mr. Siniscalchi said. (Eszter Veres)

“I’d like students to see a richer world so that they can live a richer life,” science teacher Timothy Siniscalchi said. “I don’t want my classes to just be words on a page, where rules are just things to memorize.”

The Ravenclaw house in period 4 Precalculus looks at teacher Monica Russell as she tallies the points they had accumulated by correctly solving equations. “(Class is) about having a good time,” Mrs. Russell said. “Even though we’re also serious about academics, which is kind of like my teaching philosophy.” (Eszter Veres)

“My sophomore year of high school, I had Algebra 2, and  really struggled a lot. I had no clue how to factor. I could not figure it out for the life of me, until I had this one teacher who would explain everything so that I understood it,” math teacher Monica Russell said. “I was like wow! A teacher can actually make such a difference in someone’s life. It helped my whole self esteem. So because I struggled with math for a little bit, I relate to students who also struggle with it..”

Social studies teacher Blake Ecker delivers a lecture on a section from the AP Human Geography AMSCO textbook while her students take notes. “I’m new to Dreyfoos and I’m really proud to be here,” Ms. Ecker said. “I figured out pretty fast that if I wanted to get into teaching, I wanted it to be here. I waited my turn, then this year there was an opening and so I took the chance. I’m really happy to be here.” (Eszter Veres)

“I promised myself when I got into (teaching) that I would make my lessons interesting enough to be something that sticks with (the students),” social studies teacher Blake Ecker said. “The impact that I want is more like (students) understanding (their) capabilities of being able to figure something out. It’s having enough confidence in yourself that you are capable of doing something harder than you thought you could do.”

AP English Literature teacher Moriah Carlisle explains the agenda for the day, starting with the bellringer assignment, a poem by Rupi Kaur. “When I saw Dreyfoos (online), I read more on it and was like, oh, it’s an art school,” Ms. Carlisle said. “I always wanted to be in a performing arts school, it was my dream school. That’s where I wanted to be.” (Ezster Veres)

“I love how creative English is,” language arts teacher Moriah Carlisle said. “When I was in middle school, I started writing poetry as a way to express how I was feeling.”

Senior communications major Mallory Marshall laughs as she asks a question regarding the short story, Cathedral by Carver, the piece they had been working on as a class. “Cathedral was a very new look on (the) world view for me,” Marshall said. “I got to read about how different characters have (their) own opinion of the world and people in it.” (Eszter Veres)

“Everything has prepared me and my teaching career to be here, and (it’s an) honor to be in a space that’s full of creativity, that’s full of amazing teachers and awesome students,” Mrs. Carlisle said. “I’m just super blessed to be here.”

Freshman strings major Conner Gross shakes maracas in his hands, exploring a staple in Latin music which foreign language teacher Nathalie Ramirez will be covering throughout the year. “When you speak the language of the person it (speaks) to the heart,” Ms. Ramirez said. “It touches (people) more.” (Eszter Veres)

“I love the arts. Being surrounded with so many talented students, it’s just like, I feel alive,” foreign language teacher Nathalie Ramirez said. “It’s really truly magic(al) like Mrs. Bennett says. I can’t wait to see students’ performances. I will try to be there as much as possible, because you guys are so awesome.”

 

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About the Contributor
Genesis Arrieta
Genesis Arrieta, Writer
Genesis Arrieta is a first-year staffer and coverage staffer on The Muse. Her interests outside of writing include playing music with her ukulele and piano. Genesis strives to strengthen her skills in journalism and create stories that will inspire and educate those around her.
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